Controversies

Monroe, K. R. (2018). The Rush to Transparency: DA-RT and the Potential Dangers for Qualitative Research. Perspectives on Politics, 16(01), 141–148. https://doi.org/10.1017/S153759271700336X
Drummond, C. (2018). Reproducible research: a minority opinion. Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence, 30(1), 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1080/0952813X.2017.1413140
Smith, J. K., Smith, L. F., & Smith, B. K. (2017). The reproducibility crisis in psychology: Attack of the clones or phantom menace? Toward a More Perfect Psychology: Improving Trust, Accuracy, and Transparency in Research., 273–287. https://doi.org/10.1037/0000033-017
Jarvis, M. F., & Williams, M. (2016). Irreproducibility in Preclinical Biomedical Research: Perceptions, Uncertainties, and Knowledge Gaps. Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, 37(4), 290–302. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tips.2015.12.001
Coyne, J. C. (2016). Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology. BMC Psychology, 4(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40359-016-0134-3
Vetter, T. R., McGwin, G., & Pittet, J. F. (2016). Replicability, Reproducibility, and Fragility of Research Findings-Ultimately, Caveat Emptor. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 123(1), 244–248. https://doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000001398
Freedman, L. P., Cockburn, I. M., & Simcoe, T. S. (2015). The economics of reproducibility in preclinical research. PLoS Biology, 13(6), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002165
Carey, B. (2015). Many Psychology Findings Not as Strong as Claimed, Study Says. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/28/science/many-social-science-findings-not-as-strong-as-claimed-study-says.html?mcubz=0